1. If you don’t write when you don’t have time for it, you won’t write when you do have time for it.

    If you don’t write when you don’t have time for it, you won’t write when you do have time for it.

  2. 5 Ways To Keep Me Reading Your First Chapter

    lettersandlight:

    image

    Camp NaNoWriMo 2014 has officially launched! Whether you’re writing a new novel, tackling a screenplay, or finishing an existing piece of work, Camp is a writing free-for-all. For those of you still on your publishing journey before Camp, Blair Thornburgh, assistant editor at Quirk Books, explains what makes her stop reading a manuscript:

    I was recently at a conference where an editor detailed her method for critiquing a first draft. The complicated process was as follows:

    1. Start reading it.
    2. When it stops being compelling, stop reading it.
    3. When you stop reading it, draw a line on the page and write “This is where I stopped reading”.

    Brash. Ballsy. Take-no-prisoners.

    But what specifically makes an editor grind to a halt and refuse to go on? Opinions differ, of course, but as far as I’m concerned there are some pretty basic “don’t”s that make me want to close a document while I’m reading a sample chapter:

    Read More

  3. Advice: Characters but No Setting, Plot, or Antagonist →

    writing-questions-answered:

  4. Mhairi Stewart on science and creative writing in schools, via Scottish Book Trust →

  5. Enter the West Sussex Writers National Short Story Competition →

    Maximum word count: 3000

    Unthemed

    Closing Date: 31st March 2014

    Fee: £5 per entry

    Prizes: 1st prize £200; 2nd prize £75; 3rd prize £50



    The winners will also receive a critique from our final judge,

    Pam Weaver


    Pam Weaver is a former Chair and current member of West Sussex Writers. As well as having had considerable success as a short story writer, Pam is the author of several novels including There’s Always Tomorrow, Better Days Will come and Pack Up Your Troubles, all published by Avon.

  6. Young writer? Enter the Dylan Thomas writing competition →

    Have your work read and broadcast by Dylan Thomas fans such as Radio 1 DJ Huw Stephens and be in with a chance to have your writing published. Literature Wales invites all of you budding writers aged between 7 and 25 to enter our Dylan Thomas international competition. Your entry can be a song lyric, a poem, a funny limerick – any form of creative writing as long as it has been inspired by the Welsh writer Dylan Thomas and is no longer than thirty lines. Deadline: Friday 27 June.

  7. "It’s like a fingerprint of singing voice. There’s something that belongs to you that just gets into your writing." Lorrie Moore

    "It’s like a fingerprint of singing voice. There’s something that belongs to you that just gets into your writing." Lorrie Moore

    (Source: lastnightsreading)

  8. Seven Quotes On Writing from Julia Cameron
We should write because it is human nature to write. Writing claims our world. It makes it directly and specifically our own. We should write because humans are spiritual beings and writing is a powerful form of prayer and meditation, connecting us both to our own insights and to a higher and deeper level of inner guidance.
We should write because writing brings clarity and passion to the act of living. Writing is sensual, experiential, grounding. We should write because writing is good for the soul. We should write because writing yields us a body of work, a felt path through the world we live in. 
We should write, above all, because we are writers, whether we call ourselves that or not.
Writing is like breathing, it’s possible to learn to do it well, but the point is to do it no matter what.
Just as a good rain clears the air, a good writing day clears the psyche.
Being in the mood to write, like being in the mood to make love, is a luxury that isn’t necessary in a long-term relationship. Just as the first caress can lead to a change of heart, the first sentence, however tentative and awkward, can lead to a desire to go just a little further.
Doing it all the time, whether or not we are in the mood, gives us ownership of our writing ability. It takes it out of the realm of conjuring where we stand on the rock of isolation, begging the winds for inspiration, and it makes it something as do-able as picking up a hammer and pounding a nail. Writing may be an art, but it is certainly a craft. It is a simple and workable thing that can be as steady and reliable as a chore—does that ruin the romance?
Cameron is an American teacher, author, artist, and poet. She is most famous for her books The Artist’s Way and The Right to Write.
Source for Image
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

    Seven Quotes On Writing from Julia Cameron

    1. We should write because it is human nature to write. Writing claims our world. It makes it directly and specifically our own. We should write because humans are spiritual beings and writing is a powerful form of prayer and meditation, connecting us both to our own insights and to a higher and deeper level of inner guidance.
    2. We should write because writing brings clarity and passion to the act of living. Writing is sensual, experiential, grounding. We should write because writing is good for the soul. We should write because writing yields us a body of work, a felt path through the world we live in. 
    3. We should write, above all, because we are writers, whether we call ourselves that or not.
    4. Writing is like breathing, it’s possible to learn to do it well, but the point is to do it no matter what.
    5. Just as a good rain clears the air, a good writing day clears the psyche.
    6. Being in the mood to write, like being in the mood to make love, is a luxury that isn’t necessary in a long-term relationship. Just as the first caress can lead to a change of heart, the first sentence, however tentative and awkward, can lead to a desire to go just a little further.
    7. Doing it all the time, whether or not we are in the mood, gives us ownership of our writing ability. It takes it out of the realm of conjuring where we stand on the rock of isolation, begging the winds for inspiration, and it makes it something as do-able as picking up a hammer and pounding a nail. Writing may be an art, but it is certainly a craft. It is a simple and workable thing that can be as steady and reliable as a chore—does that ruin the romance?

    Cameron is an American teacher, author, artist, and poet. She is most famous for her books The Artist’s Way and The Right to Write.

    Source for Image

    by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

  9. Khaled Hosseini's writing tips →

    Nine Quotes

    1. Nothing happens in a vacuum in life: every action has a series of consequences, and sometimes it takes a long time to fully understand the consequences of our actions.
    2. Writing for me is largely about rewriting.
    3. I don’t listen to music when I write - I find it distracting.
    4. Reading is an active, imaginative act; it takes work.
    5. The difficulty of writing a second novel is directly proportional to how successful the first novel was, it seems.
    6. There’s nothing easy about writing. It’s always difficult. It’s always a struggle.
    7. I have met so many people who say they’ve got a book in them, but they’ve never written a word. To be a writer - this may seem trite, I realise - you have to actually write.
    8. The experience of writing ‘The Kite Runner’ is one I will always think back on with fondness. There is an energy, a romance in writing the first novel that can never be duplicated again.
    9. You write because you have an idea in your mind that feels so genuine, so important, so true. And yet, by the time this idea passes through the different filters of your mind, and into your hand, and onto the page or computer screen - it becomes distorted, and it’s been diminished.

    Khaled Hosseini: On learning to read at a little bookshop in Kabul

    by Amanda Patterson

  10. "There have been great societies that did not use the wheel, but there have been no societies that did not tell stories," Ursula K Le Guin

    "There have been great societies that did not use the wheel, but there have been no societies that did not tell stories," Ursula K Le Guin